Empty moves - Hotel Columbia
Hotel Columbia is conveniently situated in the heart of the historic centre of Rome, between the Opera House and the last bastion of the Diocletian Baths. It is within walking distance to Termini, the main railway station where taxis, buses and the subway can be taken to all places of interest. From Hotel Columbia every major monument and tourist attraction is easily reached by a short walk.
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14 May Empty moves

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA – Teatro Nazionale

th2K1SPZIE3 min (190 m)

Via del Viminale, 54

Ph +39 064817003

Empty moves

Choreography by Angelin Preljocaj

Sound
John Cage, Empty words
recorded live at the Teatro Lirico di Milano on December 2nd, 1977
Special thanks to Goran Vejvoda
Assistant, Deputy to the Artistic Director Youri Van den Bosch
Choreologist Dany Lévêque
Cast: Nuriya Nagimova, Yurié Tsugawa, Fabrizio Clemente and Baptiste Coissieu

May 30th – 21:00

official website
box office

empty moves

© Jean-Claude Carbonne

After creating Empty moves (part I) in 2004, followed by (part II) in 2007, Angelin Preljocaj wished to pursue his study of movement based on the work Empty Words by John Cage.

“Empty moves consists of actions and movements inspired by the words and phonemes read by John Cage at the Teatro Lirico in Milan and recorded live on December 2nd, 1977. The notion of an alienation effect, the deconstruction of movement and a new expression of choreographic phrasing prevail over the definition and essence of the movements. Thus the piece establishes a link with Henry David Thoreau’s text, which was the inspiration for John Cage, and a connection to the unflinching determination of the instigator of that evening in Milan.” Angelin Preljocaj ( www.preljocaj.org )